SPATIAL LANGUAGE AND MORE

Using a mat [box shape] leads to most language for spatial relationships: on, off, beside, near, far etc.

By dividing the mat into two parts across the middle, concepts like: above, below, high, low, over, under, top, bottom, north, south, first, last can be explored. Other words like sub-zero or below zero, subway, submarine etc, can be introduced. When printing on lines, letters have parts above and below those lines. When reading the temperature we use the terms above and below zero. Music notes go above and below lines. We study animals that live, above and below ground. Dividing it into three parts shows a top, middle and bottom. Letters printed on lines have parts in the top, middle and bottom.


By dividing the mat into two parts down the middle, concepts like; first, last, first, second, left, right, east, west, beginning and ending can be developed. This concept can be related to identifying or listening for first and last sounds in a word, first and last parts of a story and first and last digits in a number. We find numbers that come before and after a number. It can also be linked to the language used when telling time on a clock. [to, past, before, after] Dividing it into three parts shows a beginning, middle and end as found in words and stories.


By examining the diagonal, children are better prepared for seeing edges and corners. It helps them to see sets within that framework. Some games require use of the diagonal.

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