DIRECTIONAL LANGUAGE

When children read and write letters, words and sentences, there is a left to right, top to bottom progression. Children learn where to start. The language for the structure of the box gives the teacher and child a common way of communicating where to begin.

Simple patterns can be made using smaller mats on a larger mat. Children walk on the pattern starting at the left and moving to right, saying the pattern aloud as they step. Sentences from chart papers may be cut into individual words, and placed across the mat. Children walk from left to right saying the words of the sentence. These activities promote one to one correspondence and phrasing.

Wool can be used to make large numbers and lower case letters on the mat. Children watch the formation as the teacher lays the wool on the mat. The class decides where the number or letter begins in relation to the mat, and the direction of each part of the formation, before the children step from an edge to where the letter or number begins. As they walk on the wool, they use directional language to tell where they are going. [up, over, around, down, across, back etc.]

 

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